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Glycobiology

Desialylation of insulin receptors and IGF-1 receptors by neuraminidase-1 controls the net proliferative response of L6 myoblasts to insulin.


PMID 20100694

Abstract

We recently established that the subunit of cell surface-residing elastin receptor, neuraminidase-1 (Neu1), can desialylate adjacent insulin-like growth factor 1 receptors (IGF-1R) of arterial smooth muscle cells, thereby quenching their proliferative response to insulin-like growth factor II. In this study, we explored whether Neu1 would also desialylate the insulin receptors (IR), as well as the IGF-1R on rat skeletal L6 myoblasts, and whether desialylation of IR and IGF-1R would affect a net proliferative effect of insulin. First, we found that physiological (0.5-1 nM) and high therapeutic (10 nM) insulin concentrations induced a modest increase in proliferation rate of cultured L6 myoblasts. While IR kinase inhibitor could abolish the mitogenic effect of these insulin concentrations, the observed more pronounced proliferative response to supraphysiological concentration (100 nM) of insulin could be eliminated only by specific inhibition of IGF-1R. Then, we found that treatment of L6 cells with mouse-derived Neu1 or with Clostridium perfringens neuraminidase caused desialylation of IR, which coincided with a significant increase of their proliferative response to lower (0.5-10 nM) concentrations of insulin. In contrast, experimental desialylation of IGF-1R coincided with elimination of the heightened proliferative response of L6 myoblasts to 100 nM insulin. Importantly, we also found that inhibition of endogenous Neu1 abolished the increase in proliferation of L6 cells induced by 1 and 10 nM of insulin, but amplified the proliferative effect of 100 nM insulin. We therefore conclude that desialylation of both IR and IGF-1R by Neu1 controls the net proliferative response of skeletal myoblasts to insulin.