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Environmental toxicology

Elevated serum ferritin and mercury concentrations are associated with hypertension; analysis of the fourth and fifth Korea national health and nutrition examination survey (KNHANES IV-2, 3, 2008-2009 and V-1, 2010).


PMID 23929718

Abstract

The impact of simultaneously elevated serum ferritin and mercury concentrations on hypertension in the general population is not known. To determine the association of serum ferritin and mercury concentrations with hypertension, 6213 subjects (3060 men and 3153 women) over 20 years of age from 2008 to 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were divided into tertiles according to serum ferritin and mercury concentrations in each gender. Serum ferritin (258.2 vs. 94.8 pmol/L) and mercury concentrations (28.4 vs. 19.9 nmol/L) were higher in men than in women. Serum ferritin (men; P = 0.029, women; P < 0.001) and mercury (men; P < 0.001, women; P = 0.003) concentrations were significantly associated with the prevalence of hypertension. In addition, significant correlation between serum ferritin and mercury concentrations in both men (r = 0.193, P < 0.001) and women (r = 0.145, P < 0.001) were found. Also, the increase of serum ferritin concentrations were more prominent in men (P < 0.001) than in women (P = 0.017) as the serum mercury tertiles increased after proper adjustments. Furthermore, significantly higher odds ratios of hypertension were found in the second (OR = 1.86, 95% CI; 1.05-3.30), and third (OR = 1.84, 95% CI; 1.01-3.36) tertiles of serum ferritin with the top tertile of serum mercury in men. The current study indicate that serum ferritin and mercury concentrations are associated with the prevalence of hypertension and that simultaneously elevated serum ferritin and mercury concentrations are related to the risk for hypertension in men.

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294594
Mercury, electronic grade, 99.9999% trace metals basis
Hg