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Cell biology international

Salidroside induces rat mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons.


PMID 24323403

Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterised by the loss of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons that leads to a reduction in striatal dopamine (DA) levels. Replacing lost cells by transplanting dopaminergic neurons has potential value to repair the damaged brain. Salidroside (SD), a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from plant Rhodiola rosea, is neuroprotective. We examined whether salidroside can induce mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate into neuron-like cells, and convert MSCs into dopamine neurons that can be applied in clinical use. Salidroside induced rMSCs to adopt a neuronal morphology, upregulated the expression of neuronal marker molecules, such as gamma neuronal enolase 2 (Eno2/NSE), microtubule-associated protein 2 (Map2), and beta 3 class III tubulin (Tubb3/β-tubulin III). It also increased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and nerve growth factor (NGF) mRNAs, and promoted the secretion of these growth factors. The expression of dopamine neurons markers, such as dopamine-beta-hydroxy (DBH), dopa decarboxylase (DDC) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), was significantly upregulated after treatment with salidroside for 1-12 days. DA steadily increased after treatment with salidroside for 1-6 days. Thus salidroside can induce rMSCs to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons.