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Neonatology

Early enteral fat supplementation improves protein absorption in premature infants with an enterostomy.


PMID 24603562

Abstract

Early enteral fat supplementation and fish oil (FO) stimulates post-resection intestinal adaptation in rats and increases fat absorption in premature infants with bowel resection and an enterostomy. To test the hypothesis that early fat supplement and FO increases post-resection protein absorption, intestinal RNA, protein without decreasing intestinal arachidonic acid (AA) in premature infants with an enterostomy. 36 premature infants (<2 months old) with an enterostomy after surgical treatment for necrotizing enterocolitis or spontaneous intestinal perforation who tolerated enteral feeding at 20 ml/kg/day were randomized to usual care (control, n = 18) or early supplementing enteral Microlipid (ML) and FO (treatment, n = 18). Intralipid was decreased as the dose of enteral fat was increased. Daily weight, ostomy output and nutritional intake were recorded. Weekly 24-hour ostomy effluent was collected to measure fecal protein. Protein absorption was calculated by subtracting fecal protein from dietary protein. Tissue samples from the functional stoma and the nonfunctional distal diverted end were collected during bowel reanastomosis to measure RNA, protein, and fatty acid (FA) profile. Compared to controls, the treatment group had higher protein absorption (g/kg/day) and intestinal RNA and protein (μg/mg tissue) proximal to the ostomy. The two groups had similar FA profiles except that the treatment group had higher n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, μg/mg tissue) proximal to the ostomy. Early supplementation of enteral ML and FO to premature infants with an enterostomy increased dietary protein absorption, intestinal RNA, protein and n-3 EPA content without altering other FA content.