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Journal of applied toxicology : JAT

In vitro evaluation of the effects of perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on IL-2 production in human T-cells.


PMID 25056757

Abstract

Perfluorinated compounds, such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), have been shown to alter various immune functions suggesting they are immunotoxic. This study assessed the effects of PFOS and PFOA on interleukin (IL)-2 production in the human Jurkat T-cell line and PFOS in healthy human primary T cells. Jurkat cells were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA)/phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), anti CD-3/anti CD-28, or anti CD-3, and dosed with 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 50, 75, or 100 µg ml(-1) PFOS or 0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, or 10 µg ml(-1) PFOA. Jurkat cells stimulated with PHA/PMA or anti CD-3 exhibited decreased IL-2 production beginning at 50 µg PFOS ml(-1) and 5 µg PFOS ml(-1) respectively, but stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 resulted in no changes compared with the control. Addition of the PPAR-alpha antagonist GW6471 to PFOS-dosed cells stimulated with PHA/PMA resulted in decreases in IL-2 production starting at 50 µg PFOS ml(-1), which suggests PFOS affected T-cell IL-2 production via PPAR-alpha-independent mechanisms. Exposure to PFOA, PFOA + GW6471, or PFOS + PFOA in Jurkat cells resulted in no significant differences in IL-2 production. In vitro dosing studies using healthy primary human CD4+ T cells were consistent with the Jurkat results. These data demonstrated that PFOA did not impact IL-2 production, but PFOS suppressed IL-2 production in both a human cell line and human primary cells at dose levels within the high end of the human exposure range. A decrease in IL-2 production is characteristic of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and should be further investigated.