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Archives of oral biology

Anxiolytic efficacy of repeated oral capsaicin in rats with partial aberration of oral sensory relay to brain.


PMID 25874812

Abstract

This study was conducted to examine if taste over load with oral capsaicin improves the adverse behavioural effects induced by partial aberration of oral sensory relays to brain with bilateral transections of the lingual and chorda tympani nerves. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received daily 1 ml of 0.02% capsaicin or water drop by drop into the oral cavity following the bilateral transections of the lingual and chorda tympani nerves. Rats were subjected to ambulatory activity, elevated plus maze and forced swim tests after 11th, 14th and 17th daily administration of capsaicin or water, respectively. The basal and stress-induced plasma corticosterone levels were examined after the end of behavioural tests. Ambulatory counts, distance travelled, centre zone activities and rearing were increased, and rostral grooming decreased, during the activity test in capsaicin treated rats. Behavioural scores of capsaicin rats during elevated plus maze test did not differ from control rats. Immobility during the swim test was decreased in capsaicin rats with near significance (P = 0.0547). Repeated oral capsaicin increased both the basal level and stress-induced elevation of plasma corticosterone in rats with bilateral transections of the lingual and chorda tympani nerves. It is concluded that repeated oral administration of capsaicin reduces anxiety-like behaviours in rats that received bilateral transections of the lingual and chorda tympani nerves, and that the increased corticosterone response, possibly modulating the hippocampal neural plasticity, may be implicated in the anxiolytic efficacy of oral capsaicin.