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European review for medical and pharmacological sciences

Acid sphingomyelinase, a novel negative biomarker of ovarian cancer.


PMID 26125272

Abstract

Ovarian cancer is the sixth most common cancer and the main cause of death in women. However, the molecular mechanism for the cause of the ovarian cancer has not been fully elucidated. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), a lipid hydrolase, has been suggested for treating cancer and may affect the development of ovarian cancer. We want to find the function of ASM in the development of ovarian cancer. Human ovarian cancer cells HO 8910 (HOCC) and human primary ovarian cells (HPOC) were transfected with ASM gene and ASM RNAi. Real-time qPCR and western blot analysis was carried out to examine the level of ASM. The growth rate of transfected and non-transfected cells was measured. Ovarian biopsies were collected from 80 ovarian cancer patients and 20 healthy subjects. The growth rate of HOCC and HPOC was decreased by 22% and 19% in the ASM-transfected group compared with non-transfected group. Inversely, the growth rate of HOCC and HPOC was increased by 16% and 35% in the ASM-RNAi-transfected group compared with non-transfected group. In the transfected and non-transfected cells, the change level of SAM was approved by Real-time qPCR and western blot analysis. The levels of SAM were reducing with the development of ovarian cancer. SAM is higher expressed in normal cell than that in ovarian cancer, and can be a negative biomarker for the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. SAM can be developed a new drug for the ovarian cancer therapy.