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Mycoses

In vitro postantifungal effect, adhesion traits and haemolysin production of Candida dubliniensis isolates following exposure to 5-fluorocytosine.


PMID 26201447

Abstract

The phenomenon of postantifungal effect (PAFE), which is the suppression of candidal growth following brief exposure to antifungal agents, is linked with candidal pathogenicity. Adhesion to buccal epithelial cells (BEC), germ tube (GT) formation and relative cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) are all adhesion traits of candidal pathogenicity. Ability to produce haemolysin by Candida species is also a determinant of its pathogenicity. There is no information on either the PAFE or its impact on adhesion traits and haemolysin production of oral Candida dubliniensis isolates following exposure to 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Hence, the focus of this investigation was to research the in vitro PAFE, adhesion to BEC, GT formation, relative CSH and haemolysin production on 20 C. dubliniensis isolates following exposure to 5-FC. Following obtaining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 5-FC, isolates of C. dubliniensis were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations (×3 MIC) of 5-FC for 1 h. After this brief exposure, the antimycotic was removed and PAFE, adhesion to BEC, GT formation, relative CSH and haemolysin production was determined by formerly described in vitro methods. MIC (μg/ml) of C. dubliniensis isolates to 5-FC ranged from 0.002 to 0.125. The mean PAFE (hours) elicited by 5-FC on C. dubliniensis isolates was approximately 1 h. Exposure to 5-FC suppressed the ability of C. dubliniensis isolates to adhere BEC, GT formation, relative CSH and haemolysin activity by a mean percentage reduction in 50.98%, 29.51%, 36.79% and 12.75% (P < 0.001 for all) respectively. Therefore, brief exposure of C. dubliniensis isolates to 5-FC appears to exert an antifungal effect by subduing its growth, adhesion traits as well as haemolysin production.