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Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology

Juvenile growth reduces the influence of epithelial sodium channels on myogenic tone in skeletal muscle arterioles.


PMID 27560463

Abstract

Previous studies have documented that rapid juvenile growth is accompanied by functional changes in the arteriolar endothelium, but much less is known about functional changes in arteriolar smooth muscle over this period. In this study, we investigate the possible contribution of epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) to the myogenic behaviour of arterioles at two stages of juvenile growth. The effects of the ENaC inhibitor benzamil on different levels of myogenic tone were studied in isolated gracilis muscle arterioles from rats aged 21-28xa0days ("weanlings") and 42-49xa0days ("juveniles"). ENaC subunit expression in the arteriolar wall was also determined, and the interaction between ENaC and nitric oxide (NO) in regulating vascular tone was explored by combined use of benzamil and N(G) -monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA). At physiological pressures, both steady-state myogenic tone and the dynamic adjustments in this tone triggered by acute pressure changes were less in juvenile arterioles than in weanling arterioles. α, β and γ ENaC protein was present in arterioles at both ages, but benzamil only had an effect on myogenic tone in weanling arterioles. In these vessels, benzamil increased, rather than decreased, myogenic tone, and this effect was prevented by l-NMMA or endothelial removal. These findings suggest that although ENaC is present in gracilis muscle arterioles of both weanling and juvenile rats, it is not obligatory for the genesis of myogenic activity in these vessels at either age. However, ENaC activity can significantly modulate the level of myogenic tone through stimulation of endothelial NO release at an early stage of growth.

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