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Cell and tissue research

Cavin-3 (PRKCDBP) deficiency reduces the density of caveolae in smooth muscle.


PMID 28285351

Abstract

Cavins belong to a family of proteins that contribute to the formation of caveolae, which are membrane organelles with functional roles in muscle and fat. Here, we investigate the effect of cavin-3 ablation on vascular and urinary bladder structure and function. Arteries and urinary bladders from mice lacking cavin-3 (knockout: KO) and from controls (wild type: WT) were examined. Our studies revealed that the loss of cavin-3 resulted in ∼40% reduction of the caveolae protein cavin-1 in vascular and bladder smooth muscle. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the loss of cavin-3 was accompanied by a reduction of caveolae abundance by 40-45% in smooth muscle, whereas the density of caveolae in endothelial cells was unchanged. Vascular contraction in response to an α1-adrenergic agonist was normal but nitric-oxide-dependent relaxation was enhanced, in parallel with an increased relaxation on direct activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). This was associated with an elevated expression of sGC, although blood pressure was similar in WT and KO mice. Contraction of the urinary bladder was not affected by the loss of cavin-3. The proteomic response to outlet obstruction, including STAT3 phosphorylation, the induction of synthetic markers and the repression of contractile markers were identical in WT and KO mice, the only exception being a curtailed induction of the Golgi protein GM130. Loss of cavin-3 thus reduces the number of caveolae in smooth muscle and partly destabilizes cavin-1 but the functional consequences are modest and include an elevated vascular sensitivity to nitric oxide and slightly disturbed Golgi homeostasis in situations of severe cellular stress.