The Alfred R. Bader Award for Student Innovation 2017 in Synthetic Organic Chemistry

 

Bader Student Chemistry Symposium Registration

Thank you to all who submitted research projects in the Alfred R. Bader Award for Student Innovation program for 2017.

We will celebrate with our four finalists from 2 p.m.-6 p.m. Sept. 7 in Darmstadt, Germany, and select one grand-prize winner. Our finalists will make presentations of their research in synthetic organic chemistry, and we’ll hear from Keynote Speaker Dr. Klaus Urbahns, head of Discovery Technologies, Biopharma. 
Guests and media are welcome to attend. Please register now.

Finalists:

  • Thomas McTeague, Photoredox Activation of SF6 for Fluorination
  • Robynne Neff, Design and Development of a New Commercially Viable Pd(0)-Catalyst
  • Keita Tanaka, Palladium-catalyzed Remote C–H Activation with Bifunctional Template
  • Jennifer Matsui, Photoredox-Mediated Dual Catalysis and Metal-Free C–H Alkylation: Incorporating New Radical Precursors and Utilizing Complex Alkyltrifluoroborates for Late-Stage Functionalization

This annual award program focuses on:

  • Development of new reagents, catalysts, ligands, technologies, software, labware, or instrumentation broadly applicable to synthetic organic chemistry
  • Creative use of current reagents, catalysts, and ligands in methodology or total synthesis projects

Event Schedule
 

2 p.m. Welcome and opening remarks
2:15 p.m. Thomas McTeague - Photoredox Activation of SF6 for Fluorination
2:45 p.m. Robynne Neff - Design and Development of a New Commercially Viable Pd(0)-Catalyst
3:15 p.m. Keita Tanaka - Palladium-Catalyzed Remote C–H Activation with Bifunctional Template
3:45 p.m. Jennifer Matsui - Photoredox-Mediated Dual Catalysis and Metal-Free C–H Alkylation: Incorporating New Radical Precursors and Utilizing Complex Alkyltrifluoroborates for Late-Stage Functionalization
4:15 p.m. Keynote speech: Klaus Urbahns, head of Discovery Technologies, Merck Healthcare
Klaus Urbahns has 20 years of experience in the biopharmaceutical industry. He is head of the Discovery Technology Platform at Merck Healthcare R&D with laboratories in the U.S., Israel, and Germany. His team's role is to generate small molecule drug candidates and therapeutic proteins.
4:45 p.m. Announcement of grand prize winner and presentation of awards
5 p.m. Reception

 

About the Bader Awards

As a young chemistry graduate student, Alfred R. Bader valued service and selection. It was these ideals on which he cofounded the Aldrich Chemical Company in 1951. Bader sought to save research chemists time by providing quality standardized chemicals. He was one of the foremost chemical innovators of his time, and his legacy continues in the Sigma-Aldrich name and in many philanthropic designations and honors.

Soon after cofounding Aldrich, Bader fostered global relationships with small chemical suppliers and his ever-innovative customers to grow his catalogue and company. The result was fast success and the development of one of the best-known chemical catalogues. In 1975, the company’s name changed to Sigma-Aldrich after a merger. Today, the name continues as part of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany. Bader’s commitment to collaboration with scientists, cutting-edge products, and outstanding quality lives on through the dedication of current employees and outreach activities like the Alfred R. Bader Award for Student Innovation.

More than a decade’s worth of chemistry graduate students have participated in the Alfred R. Bader Awards for Student Innovation. Over the years the prize amounts and application criteria have varied, but the awards have always recognized the work of up-and-coming chemists with big ideas. Previous awardees include Sigma-Aldrich partners Abby Doyle and Stephen T. Heller.

Learn more:

Read the company history from 2001 as presented in the Aldrichimica Acta.

Who was Alfred Bader? Read the chemist-collector’s bio from 1984.

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