Pyridines

Pyridines are heterocyclic six-membered aromatic compounds containing a single nitrogen atom. Pyridines are a class of important heterocycles and appear in many naturally occurring bioactive compounds, pharmaceutical molecules, and chiral ligands in polysubstituted forms. The pyridine moiety is present in countless molecules with applications as varied as catalysis, drug design, molecular recognition, and natural product synthesis. Examples of pyridines include the well-known alkaloids lycodine, the A3 adenosine receptor antagonist, and a N,N-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) analogue commonly applied in organic synthesis. Pyridine derivatives have also been implicated as small molecule α-helical mimetics in the inhibition of protein-protein interactions, and functionally selective GABAA ligands. Halogenated pyridines in particular are attractive building blocks for various cross-coupling methodologies, including Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions.

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Pyridines