Serum-Free Media

Vaccine Production

Cultured cells have long been known to serve as excellent hosts for propagation of many types of viruses. The ability of cell culture systems to produce large quantities of attenuated viral particles has served as the basis for the production of both human and veterinary vaccines. Traditional methods have relied on the production of viral agents in cells cultured in medium supplemented with serum, most commonly fetal bovine serum. The animal serum in cell cultures used in production processes can cause a number of problems for manufacturers. The increased costs of raw materials and post-production processing associated with serum have prompted interest in the development of serum-free media for vaccine production. More recently, the potential for contamination by adventitious agents present in serum has heightened regulatory concerns regarding the use of animal-derived components in media used for pharmaceutical manufacturing. With these factors in mind, Sigma has developed new media for vaccine production with reduced levels or completely devoid of animal-derived components. At the same time, we will continue our commitment to traditional manufacturing methods by maintaining and expanding the range of basal media for use with serum supplementation and serve as the basis for customization into serum-free formulations.

The ability to genetically engineer viral particles for use as therapeutic agents to treat genetic diseases (gene therapy) represents one exciting new avenue that science and technology are bringing to modern medicine. Cultured cells have long been known to serve as excellent hosts for the propagation of many types of viruses. Traditional methods have relied on the growth of viral agents in cells cultured in serum-supplemented media. A great concern is the potential for contamination by adventitious agents introduced into the manufacturing process through the use of animal-derived materials. This has heightened regulatory concerns regarding the use of such components in media employed in pharmaceutical manufacturing, particularly in the case of therapeutic injectables. These concerns have led to recommendations that all animal-derived components be avoided when therapeutic agents are manufactured. It is likely that these recommendations will become rigid requirements in the near future. With these factors in mind, Sigma has developed new media tailored to the needs of two of the more popular cell lines used for the propagation of viral particles employed in gene therapy. These media are formulated without the use of animal-derived components.

Vaccine Production Media and Supplements
Gene Therapy Media