Attention:

Certain features of Sigma-Aldrich.com will be down for maintenance the evening of Friday August 18th starting at 8:00 pm CDT until Saturday August 19th at 12:01 pm CDT.   Please note that you still have telephone and email access to our local offices. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Gelatin

By: George Sitterley, BioFiles 2008, 3.8, 10.

Gelatin is a heterogeneous mixture of water-soluble proteins of high average molecular weights, present in collagen. The proteins are extracted by boiling skin, tendons, ligaments, bones, etc. in water.1 Type A gelatin is derived from acid-cured tissue and Type B gelatin is derived from lime-cured tissue.2

Applications using gelatin include coating cell culture plates to improve cell attachment for a variety of cell types, addition to PCR to help stabilize Taq DNA polymerase,3 and use as a blocking reagent in Western blotting, ELISA, and immunohistochemistry.4 In bacteriology, gelatin can be used as a component of culture media for species differentiation.5 Additionally, as a biocompatible polymer, gelatin has been used as a delivery vehicle for the release of bioactive molecules6 and in the generation of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.7

Industrial applications include the use of gelatin as a stabilizer, thickener, and texturizer in foods and in the manufacture of rubber substitutes, adhesives, cements, lithographic and printing inks, plastic compounds, artificial silk, photographic plates and films, matches, and light filters for mercury lamps.1 In the pharmaceutical industry, gelatin is used as a suspending agent, encapsulating agent, and tablet binder; and in veterinary applications it is used as a plasma expander and hemostatic sponge.1

back to top Back to Top

Gelatins

Name Source Storage Temp Target Cells For Attachment Concentration For Use Cat. No.
Gelatin solution 2-8°C Used for attachment of a variety of cell types 100 ‑ 200 μg/cm2 G1393
Gelatin, powder from bovine skin Room temp Used for attachment of a variety of cell types 100 ‑ 200 μg/cm2 G9391
Gelatin, powder from porcine skin Room temp Used for attachment of a variety of cell types 100 ‑ 200 μg/cm2 G1890
Gelatin, lyophilized powder from porcine skin Room temp Used for attachment of a variety of cell types 100 ‑ 200 μg/cm2 G9136

Materials

     

References

  1. Merck Index, 12th Ed., S. Budavari, Ed., p. 742, # 4388 (1996).
  2. Supplier data.
  3. PCR Primer: A Laboratory Manual, C. Dieffenbach and G. S. Dveksler, Eds., Cold Spring Harbor, NY (1995).
  4. Vogt, R. F., Jr., Quantitative differences among various proteins as blocking agents for ELISA microtiter plates. J. Immunol. Methods 101, 43, (1987).
  5. Levine, M., and Carpenter, D.C., Gelatin liquefaction by bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 8, 297, (1923).
  6. Young, S. et al., Gelatin as a delivery vehicle for the controlled release of bioactive molecules. J.Control Release 109, 256-274 (2005).
  7. Huang Y, et al. In vitro characterization of chitosan-gelatin scaffolds for tissue engineering. Biomaterials 26, 7616-7627 (2005)

    back to top Back to Top

Related Links