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  • Response of myogenic determination factors to cessation and resumption of electrical activity in skeletal muscle: a possible role for myogenin in denervation supersensitivity.

Response of myogenic determination factors to cessation and resumption of electrical activity in skeletal muscle: a possible role for myogenin in denervation supersensitivity.

Cellular and molecular neurobiology (1992-12-01)
C M Neville, M Schmidt, J Schmidt
摘要

1. We have prepared probes specific for the chicken myogenic determination genes MyoD, myogenin, myf5, and herculin and have investigated the expression of these genes in response to denervation and acute electrical stimulation in neonate chick muscle, using ribonuclease protection. 2. Upon denervation, herculin mRNA remains essentially unchanged, myf5 transcript levels approximately double, and MyoD message is up-regulated by two- to fivefold. In contrast, the message coding for myogenin, barely detectable in innervated muscle, rises dramatically (approximately 200-fold) on the second day after nerve section; in this respect it resembles acetylcholine receptor (AChR) alpha-, gamma- and delta-subunit mRNAs. Cohybridization experiments reveal that the increase in myogenin mRNA slightly precedes the rise in AChR alpha-subunit message. 3. Electrical stimulation of denervated muscle leads to an immediate decline in myogenin and AChR alpha-subunit mRNAs, with half-lives of less than an hour and approximately 4 hr, respectively; message stability measurements suggest that this is effected through a rapid shutdown of transcription. Messages coding for MyoD, myf5, and herculin decay much more slowly, as a result of slower turnover. 4. Previous experiments have indicated the involvement of a de novo induced (Tsay, H.-J., Neville, C. M., and Schmidt, J., FEBS Lett. 274:69-72, 1990) autocatalytic (Neville, C. M., Schmidt, M., and Schmidt, J., NeuroReport 2:655-657, 1991) transcription factor in the denervation-triggered up-regulation of AChR alpha-subunit expression; the denervation and electrical stimulation experiments reported here are compatible with the notion that myogenin is that factor.