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  • Low serum vitamin B-12 and folate concentrations and low thiamin and riboflavin intakes are inversely associated with greater adiposity in Mexican American children.

Low serum vitamin B-12 and folate concentrations and low thiamin and riboflavin intakes are inversely associated with greater adiposity in Mexican American children.

The Journal of nutrition (2014-11-21)
Inong R Gunanti, Geoffrey C Marks, Abdullah Al-Mamun, Kurt Z Long
ABSTRACT

Micronutrient status may be a contributing factor to the development of childhood obesity in many industrializing countries passing the nutritional transition. The few studies investigating associations between serum concentrations of vitamin B and intake of B vitamins with adiposity, however, have reported inconsistent findings. The aim of the study was to examine associations between serum vitamin B-12 and folate concentrations and intakes of B vitamins with body fat by using data on 1131 Mexican American children 8-15 y of age included in NHANES 2001-2004. Children's body mass index (BMI), trunk fat mass (TrFM), and total body fat mass (TBFM) were used as body adiposity (BA) measures. Serum concentrations of folate and vitamin B-12 were measured in blood samples collected from children. Intake of B vitamins was collected according to 24-h dietary recall. Associations of BA with serum concentrations of vitamin B-12 and folate and intake of B vitamins were determined by using linear and multinomial regression models. Serum concentrations of vitamin B-12 and folate were inversely associated with BMI (β: -2.68, P < 0.01; β = -1.33, P < 0.01), TrFM (β:-3.32, P < 0.01; β: -0.14, P < 0.05), and TBFM (β:-1.93, P < 0.01; β: -3.19; P < 0.01). Higher serum concentrations of vitamin B-12 were associated with a reduced risk of obesity (OR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.31, 0.77; P < 0.001). Thiamin and riboflavin intakes were inversely associated with BMI (β:-1.35, P < 0.05; β: -1.11, P < 0.05) and TrFM (β:-1.26, P < 0.05; β: -1.37, P < 0.05). Similar inverse associations between BA and status of both vitamin B-12 and folate and intake of thiamin and riboflavin suggest that these micronutrients may play a role in adipogenesis and risk of childhood obesity.

MATERIALS
Product Number
Brand
Product Description

Sigma-Aldrich
Cyanocobalamin, tested according to Ph. Eur.
Sigma-Aldrich
Folic acid, BioReagent, suitable for cell culture, suitable for insect cell culture, suitable for plant cell culture, ≥97%
Sigma-Aldrich
Folic acid, ≥97%
Sigma-Aldrich
Cyanocobalamin, meets USP testing specifications
Sigma-Aldrich
Folic acid, meets USP testing specifications
Sigma-Aldrich
Cyanocobalamin, SAJ special grade, ≥95.0%
Supelco
Folic acid, Pharmaceutical Secondary Standard; Certified Reference Material
Supelco
Riboflavin (B2), analytical standard
Supelco
Cyanocobalamin (B12), analytical standard
Supelco
Cyanocobalamin (Vitamin B12) solution, 1.0 mg/mL in methanol, ampule of 1 mL, certified reference material, Cerilliant®
Cyanocobalamin, European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
Supelco
Cyanocobalamin, pharmaceutical secondary standard, certified reference material
USP
Folic acid, United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Reference Standard
Folic acid, European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
Riboflavin for peak identification, European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
Sigma-Aldrich
Vitamin B12, ≥98%
Sigma-Aldrich
(−)-Riboflavin, from Eremothecium ashbyii, ≥98%
Sigma-Aldrich
Vitamin B12, BioReagent, suitable for cell culture, suitable for insect cell culture, suitable for plant cell culture, ≥98%
Sigma-Aldrich
(−)-Riboflavin, BioReagent, suitable for cell culture, suitable for insect cell culture, ≥98%
Sigma-Aldrich
(−)-Riboflavin, meets USP testing specifications
Supelco
Riboflavin, Pharmaceutical Secondary Standard; Certified Reference Material
USP
Riboflavin, United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Reference Standard
Riboflavin, European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard