Long ascending propriospinal neurons provide flexible, context-specific control of interlimb coordination.

eLife (2020-09-10)
Amanda M Pocratsky, Courtney T Shepard, Johnny R Morehouse, Darlene A Burke, Amberley S Riegler, Josiah T Hardin, Jason E Beare, Casey Hainline, Gregory Jr States, Brandon L Brown, Scott R Whittemore, David Sk Magnuson
RESUMEN

Within the cervical and lumbar spinal enlargements, central pattern generator (CPG) circuitry produces the rhythmic output necessary for limb coordination during locomotion. Long propriospinal neurons that inter-connect these CPGs are thought to secure hindlimb-forelimb coordination, ensuring that diagonal limb pairs move synchronously while the ipsilateral limb pairs move out-of-phase during stepping. Here, we show that silencing long ascending propriospinal neurons (LAPNs) that inter-connect the lumbar and cervical CPGs disrupts left-right limb coupling of each limb pair in the adult rat during overground locomotion on a high-friction surface. These perturbations occurred independent of the locomotor rhythm, intralimb coordination, and speed-dependent (or any other) principal features of locomotion. Strikingly, the functional consequences of silencing LAPNs are highly context-dependent; the phenotype was not expressed during swimming, treadmill stepping, exploratory locomotion, or walking on an uncoated, slick surface. These data reveal surprising flexibility and context-dependence in the control of interlimb coordination during locomotion.

MATERIALES
Referencia del producto
Marca
Descripción del producto

Sigma-Aldrich
Monoclonal Anti-Neurofilament 160 antibody produced in mouse, clone NN18, ascites fluid