Merck
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MAK025

Sigma-Aldrich

Iron Assay Kit

sufficient for 100 colorimetric tests

NACRES:
NA.84

usage

sufficient for 100 colorimetric tests

detection method

colorimetric

storage temp.

−20°C

General description

Iron is a mineral that plays an essential role in many biological processes, including DNA synthesis, electron transport and oxygen transport. Iron is a transition element that can form a range of oxidation states, the most common being iron II (Fe2+ or ferrous iron) and iron III (Fe3+ or ferric iron). Iron-containing proteins participate in many reactions, often utilizing transitory changes in the oxidation state of iron to carry out chemical reactions.

Application

Iron assay kit has been used to determine the concentration of Fe2+ in wild type (WT) and Δ ferric uptake regulator (Fur) strains of A. baumannii.

Suitability

Suitable for the measurement of iron concentration in various samples

Principle

In this assay, iron is released by the addition of an acidic buffer. Samples may be tested directly to measure Fe2+ or reduced to measure total iron (Fe2+ and Fe3+). Released iron is reacted with a chromagen resulting in a colorimetric (593 nm) product, proportional to the iron present. The Iron Assay Kit provides a simple convenient means of measuring iron in a variety of biological samples.

Preparation Note

Kit is compatible with serum and tissue samples but not plasma samples.

Pictograms

Corrosion

Signal Word

Warning

Hazard Statements

Hazard Classifications

Eye Irrit. 2 - Met. Corr. 1 - Skin Irrit. 2

Storage Class Code

8A - Combustible, corrosive hazardous materials

WGK

WGK 3

Certificate of Analysis

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Certificate of Origin

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Product Information Sheet

SDS

Our team of scientists has experience in all areas of research including Life Science, Material Science, Chemical Synthesis, Chromatography, Analytical and many others.

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