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SMB00378

Sigma-Aldrich

Diallyl disulfide

≥98% (HPLC)

Synonym(s):
Diallyl disulfide, Allyl disulfide
Linear Formula:
CH2=CHCH2SSCH2CH=CH2
CAS Number:
Molecular Weight:
146.27
Beilstein:
1699241
EC Number:
MDL number:
PubChem Substance ID:
NACRES:
NA.25

Quality Level

biological source

Allium sativum L.

vapor density

>5 (vs air)

vapor pressure

1 mmHg ( 20 °C)

assay

≥98% (HPLC)

form

oil

color

colorless to yellow

refractive index

n20/D 1.541 (lit.)

bp

180-195 °C (lit.)

density

1.008 g/mL at 25 °C (lit.)

storage temp.

−20°C

SMILES string

C=CCSSCC=C

InChI

1S/C6H10S2/c1-3-5-7-8-6-4-2/h3-4H,1-2,5-6H2

InChI key

PFRGXCVKLLPLIP-UHFFFAOYSA-N

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General description

Diallyl disulfide is an organosulfur compound that is naturally found in garlic (Allium sativum) and contributes to the pungent odor of crushed garlic.

Biochem/physiol Actions

Organosulfur compound that is naturally found in garlic. Contributes to the pungent odor of crushed garlic. Anticancer agent and may provide protection against cardiovascular disease. Diallyl disulfide has been shown to be an anticancer agent and may provide protection against cardiovascular disease.It also has an ability to arrest mitosis in colon neoplastic lesions in vivo and colon tumour cell growth in vitro.
Organosulfur compound that is naturally found in garlic. Contributes to the pungent odor of crushed garlic. Anticancer agent and may provide protection against cardiovascular disease.

Pictograms

Skull and crossbones

Signal Word

Danger

Hazard Statements

Hazard Classifications

Acute Tox. 3 Oral - Eye Irrit. 2 - Skin Irrit. 2 - STOT SE 3

Target Organs

Respiratory system

Storage Class Code

6.1C - Combustible, acute toxic Cat.3 / toxic compounds or compounds which causing chronic effects

WGK

WGK 3

Flash Point(F)

143.6 °F - closed cup

Flash Point(C)

62 °C - closed cup

Certificate of Analysis

Certificate of Origin

Xiuxiu Song et al.
Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, 2021, 5103626-5103626 (2021-11-09)
Garlic is widely accepted as a functional food and an excellent source of pharmacologically active ingredients. Diallyl disulfide (DADS), a major bioactive component of garlic, has several beneficial biological functions, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, cardiovascular protective, neuroprotective, and anticancer activities.
Jaehoon Bae et al.
The Journal of nutritional biochemistry, 64, 152-161 (2018-12-06)
Obesity is a major problem in developed countries and a burden on social health care systems. Several epidemiological studies showed the protective effects of green tea against obesity-related diseases. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) acts as a mediator for the physiological
Effects of the garlic compound diallyl disulfide on the metabolism, adherence and cell cycle of HT-29 colon carcinoma cells: evidence of sensitive and resistant sub-populations.
Robert V, et al.
Carcinogenesis, 22(8), 1155-1161 (2001)
Lan Yi et al.
Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, 57, 362-370 (2013-04-16)
Considerable evidence in recent years suggests that garlic has anti-proliferative effects against various types of cancer. Garlic contains water-soluble and oil-soluble sulfur compounds. Oil-soluble compounds such as diallyl sulfide (DAS), diallyl disulfide (DADS), diallyl trisulfide (DATS) and ajoene are more
V Robert et al.
Carcinogenesis, 22(8), 1155-1161 (2001-07-27)
Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a major organosulphur compound present in garlic with an anti-mitotic potential against colon neoplastic lesions in vivo and colon tumour cell growth in vitro. Using the human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 Glc(-/+) cell line we identified sub-populations

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