All Photos(3)

209309

Sigma-Aldrich

Iron

powder, −325 mesh, 97%

Linear Formula:
Fe
CAS Number:
Molecular Weight:
55.85
EC Number:
MDL number:
PubChem Substance ID:
NACRES:
NA.22

Quality Level

assay

97%

form

powder

reaction suitability

core: iron
reagent type: catalyst

resistivity

9.71 μΩ-cm

particle size

−325 mesh

bp

2750 °C (lit.)

mp

1535 °C (lit.)

density

7.86 g/mL at 25 °C (lit.)

SMILES string

[Fe]

InChI

1S/Fe

InChI key

XEEYBQQBJWHFJM-UHFFFAOYSA-N

Application

Iron is generally used as a catalyst for wide variety of organic transformations. It has been used for the synthesis of magnetic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) for automated microcontact printing of biomolecules.
Iron can also be used:
  • For the removal of arsenate from water.
  • To synthesize Fe(III) iodide catalyst for thioglycosylation of peracetylated saccharides.
  • As a catalyst for the graphitization for microscale radiocarbon analysis of small samples.
  • For the removal of nitroaromatic pesticides by reduction.

Packaging

500 g in glass bottle
2 kg in glass bottle

Physical form

Hydrogen reduced

Pictograms

Flame

Signal Word

Danger

Hazard Statements

Precautionary Statements

Hazard Classifications

Flam. Sol. 1

Storage Class Code

4.1B - Flammable solid hazardous materials

WGK

nwg

Flash Point(F)

69.8 °F

Flash Point(C)

21 °C

Certificate of Analysis

Certificate of Origin

Fabrication of biomolecule microarrays for cell immobilization using automated microcontact printing.
Cell-Based Microarrays, 83-95 (2018)
Arsenate removal by zero valent iron: batch and column tests.
Biterna M, et al.
Journal of Hazardous Materials, 149(3), 548-552 (2007)
Diastereoselective thioglycosylation of peracetylated glycosides catalyzed by in situ generated iron (III) iodide from elemental iodine and iron.
Weng SS
Tetrahedron Letters, 50(46), 6414-6417 (2009)
Technical progress in AMS microscale radiocarbon analysis.
Uchida M, et al.
Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. Sect. B, 223(46), 313-317 (2004)
Reduction of nitroaromatic pesticides with zero-valent iron.
Keum Y S and Li Q X
Chemosphere, 54(3), 255-263 (2004)

Articles

Self-Propagating Reactions Induced by Mechanical Alloying

An article concerning self-propagating reactions induced by mechanical alloying, presented by Sigma-Aldrich.com.

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