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Impact of autolytic, proteolytic, and nisin-producing adjunct cultures on biochemical and textural properties of cheddar cheese.

Journal of dairy science (2004-09-30)
L Sallami, E E Kheadr, I Fliss, J C Vuillemard
ABSTRACT

The effect of incorporating a highly autolytic strain (Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus UL12) a proteolytic strain (Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei L2A), or a nisin Z-producing strain (Lactococcus lactis, subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis UL719) into Cheddar cheese starter culture (Lactococcus lactis KB and Lactococcus cremoris KB) on physicochemical and rheological properties of the resultant cheeses was examined. Cheeses were ripened at 7 degrees C and analyzed over a 6-mo period for viable lactococcal and lactobacilli counts, pH, titratable acidity (TA), lipolysis, proteolysis, and textural characteristics. The combination of the nisin-producing strain and autolytic adjuncts significantly increased the production of water-soluble nitrogen, free amino acids, and free fatty acids. The effect of Lc. diacetylactis UL719 alone or of Lb. casei L2A on water-soluble nitrogen and free amino acid contents were also significant, whereas their effect on free fatty acids was not. Viable counts of Lb. bulgaricus UL12 were significantly reduced in the presence of Lc. diacetylactis UL719. Lactobacilli-containing cheeses showed significantly lower values for hardness, fracturability, and springiness. It could be concluded that the addition of Lb. bulgaricus UL12 together with a nisin-producing strain produces a greater increase in cheese proteolysis and an improvement in Cheddar cheese texture.

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Sigma-Aldrich
DL-Leucine, ≥99% (HPLC)