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  • Myosin-1c regulates the dynamic stability of E-cadherin-based cell-cell contacts in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

Myosin-1c regulates the dynamic stability of E-cadherin-based cell-cell contacts in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

Molecular biology of the cell (2013-07-19)
Hiroshi Tokuo, Lynne M Coluccio
ABSTRACT

Cooperation between cadherins and the actin cytoskeleton controls the formation and maintenance of cell-cell adhesions in epithelia. We find that the molecular motor protein myosin-1c (Myo1c) regulates the dynamic stability of E-cadherin-based cell-cell contacts. In Myo1c-depleted Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, E-cadherin localization was dis-organized and lateral membranes appeared less vertical with convoluted edges versus control cells. In polarized monolayers, Myo1c-knockdown (KD) cells were more sensitive to reduced calcium concentration. Myo1c separated in the same plasma membrane fractions as E-cadherin, and Myo1c KD caused a significant reduction in the amount of E-cadherin recovered in one peak fraction. Expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Myo1c mutants revealed that the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate-binding site is necessary for its localization to cell-cell adhesions, and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays with GFP-Myo1c mutants revealed that motor function was important for Myo1c dynamics at these sites. At 18°C, which inhibits vesicle recycling, Myo1c-KD cells accumulated more E-cadherin-positive vesicles in their cytoplasm, suggesting that Myo1c affects E-cadherin endocytosis. Studies with photoactivatable GFP-E-cadherin showed that Myo1c KD reduced the stability of E-cadherin at cell-cell adhesions. We conclude that Myo1c stabilizes E-cadherin at adherens junctions in polarized epithelial cells and that the motor function and ability of Myo1c to bind membrane are critical.

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