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Blood

Immune thrombocytopenia resulting from sensitivity to metabolites of naproxen and acetaminophen.


PMID 11389025

Abstract

In patients suspected of having drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia, antibodies reactive with normal platelets in the presence of the suspect drug can sometimes be identified, but negative results are often obtained. One reason for this is that drug metabolites, formed in vivo, can be the sensitizing agents, but very little is known about the specific metabolites that can cause this complication. Five patients were studied who developed thrombocytopenia after taking the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug naproxen (3 cases) or acetaminophen (2 cases) but in whom drug-dependent antibodies could not be detected by means of the unmodified drugs. In each case, antibodies that reacted with normal target platelets in the presence of a known drug metabolite (naproxen glucuronide or acetaminophen sulfate) were identified. Four of the antibodies were specific for the glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa complex, but one acetaminophen sulfate-dependent antibody reacted preferentially with GPIb/IX/V. In patients with a clinical picture suggestive of drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia, tests for metabolite-dependent antibodies can be helpful in identifying the responsible agent. (Blood. 2001;97:3846-3850)

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UC448
Paracetamol sulfate potassium salt, solid, ≥97% (HPLC)
C8H8KNO5S