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Pharmacology & therapeutics

Catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitors in cancer therapy.


PMID 12888111

Abstract

The nuclear enzyme DNA topoisomerase II is a major target for antineoplastic agents. All topoisomerase II-directed agents are able to interfere with at least one step of the catalytic cycle. Agents able to stabilize the covalent DNA topoisomerase II complex (also known as the cleavable complex) are traditionally called topoisomerase II poisons, while agents acting on any of the other steps in the catalytic cycle are called catalytic inhibitors. Thus, catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitors are a heterogeneous group of compounds that might interfere with the binding between DNA and topoisomerase II (aclarubicin and suramin), stabilize noncovalent DNA topoisomerase II complexes (merbarone, ICRF-187, and structurally related bisdioxopiperazine derivatives), or inhibit ATP binding (novobiocin). Some, such as fostriecin, may also have alternative biological targets. Whereas topoisomerase II poisons are used solely for their antitumor activities, catalytic inhibitors are utilized for a variety of reasons, including their activity as antineoplastic agents (aclarubicin and MST-16), cardioprotectors (ICRF-187), or modulators in order to increase the efficacy of other agents (suramin and novobiocin). In this review, the mechanism and biological activity of different catalytic inhibitors is described, with emphasis on therapeutically used compounds. We will then discuss future development and applications of this interesting class of compounds.

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S2671
Suramin sodium salt, ≥99% (TLC)
C51H34N6Na6O23S6