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The Journal of experimental medicine

A functional promoter polymorphism in monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 is associated with increased susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis.


PMID 16352737

Abstract

We examined the distribution of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in nitric oxide synthase 2A, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha genes in tuberculosis patients and healthy controls from Mexico. The odds of developing tuberculosis were 2.3- and 5.4-fold higher in carriers of MCP-1 genotypes AG and GG than in homozygous AA. Cases of homozygous GG had the highest plasma levels of MCP-1 and the lowest plasma levels of IL-12p40, and these values were negatively correlated. Furthermore, stimulation of monocytes from healthy carriers of the genotype GG with Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens yielded higher MCP-1 and lower IL-12p40 concentrations than parallel experiments with monocytes from homozygous AA. Addition of anti-MCP-1 increased IL-12p40 levels in cultures of M. tuberculosis-stimulated monocytes from homozygous GG, and addition of exogenous MCP-1 reduced IL-12p40 production by M. tuberculosis-stimulated monocytes from homozygous AA. Furthermore, we could replicate our results in Korean subjects, in whom the odds of developing tuberculosis were 2.8- and 6.9-fold higher in carriers of MCP-1 genotypes AG and GG than in homozygous AA. Our findings suggest that persons bearing the MCP-1 genotype GG produce high concentrations of MCP-1, which inhibits production of IL-12p40 in response to M. tuberculosis and increases the likelihood that M. tuberculosis infection will progress to active pulmonary tuberculosis.