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Journal of neuroscience research

Role of the plasma membrane calcium adenosine triphosphatase on domoate-induced intracellular acidification in primary cultures of cerebelar granule cells.


PMID 16634067

Abstract

Changes in intracellular pH (pH(i)) and cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) caused by the glutamate agonist domoate (DOM) were studied in single cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells (CGC) by using the fluorescent probes 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM) and simultaneous evaluation of cytosolic calcium concentration with the fluorescent dye Fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester (Fura-2 AM). DOM caused a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)](c) and a concentration-dependent intracellular acidification of CGC. DOM-induced intracellular acidification was completely abolished by the use of Ca(2+)-free medium, suggesting that it was due mostly to an influx of extracellular calcium. The pH(i) decrease caused by DOM was also completely blocked in the presence of the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist CNQX, indicating that the DOM-induced intracellular acidification was caused by DOM activation of the AMPA/kainate subtype of glutamate receptors. Different mechanisms that could be involved in DOM-induced pH(i) decrease, such as displacement of H(+) by Ca(2+) from a common intracellular binding site, DOM-induced alteration of pH(i) regulation mechanisms, and a possible acidification caused by DOM-induced increase of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, were excluded. DOM-induced intracellular acidification was completely prevented by inhibitors of the plasma membrane calcium adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) (PMCA), including orthovanadate, lanthanum extracellular pH of 8.5, and the specific PMCA inhibitor caloxin 2A1. Our results therefore indicate that PMCA is involved in DOM-induced intracellular acidification in primary cultures of CGC. Simultaneous recording of [Ca(2+)](c) and pH(i) indicates that the increase in intracellular calcium evoked by DOM will activate the calcium extrusion mechanisms through the calcium pump, which, in turn, will decrease intracellular pH by countertransport of H(+) ions.

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