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Journal of pediatric surgery

Normal saline induces oxidative stress in peritoneal mesothelial cells.


PMID 18926214

Abstract

Peritoneal adhesions are the most common complication of the abdominal surgery. Normal saline is frequently used to rinse the peritoneal cavity during abdominal surgery, although there is no well-established data describing effect of such procedure on the process of formation of peritoneal adhesions. Effect of 0.9% NaCl solution on viability, oxidative stress, and fibrinolytic activity of human peritoneal mesothelial cells maintained in in vitro culture was evaluated. Exposure of mesothelial cells to 0.9% NaCl induces oxidative stress, derangement of their structure with subsequent increased release of tissue factor (+75%) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (+19%), and simultaneous suppression of tissue plasminogen activator release (-39%). In effect, ration tissue plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 was reduced in 0.9% NaCl-treated cells by 50%. Pretreatment of cells with precursor of glutathione synthesis: L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid prevented these changes. Oxidative stress in the peritoneal mesothelium caused by 0.9% NaCl activates their procoagulant activity and impairs fibrinolytic properties of these cells. These effects disqualify 0.9% NaCl as rinsing solution during abdominal surgery.

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