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Journal of feline medicine and surgery

Acute vomiting in cats: rational treatment selection.


PMID 20193913

Abstract

The control of nausea and vomiting in cats is important in order to prevent the development of food aversion, anorexia (with its associated complications of weight loss and dehydration), and hepatic lipidosis. There are several antiemetic drugs that are clinically effective in cats. Making a rational choice from the available options requires knowledge of the likely cause of the vomiting, and the mechanisms of action and side effects of each drug. For example, a drug such as prochlorperazine, which can cause sedation, may be a useful first-line choice in a hospitalized cat that requires mild sedation to be handled, but would be undesirable in a critically ill cat. For companion animal and feline practitioners, the vomiting cat is a common presentation. The guidance provided in this review draws on the findings of clinical trials in humans, experimental studies in cats, some clinical trials in cats, and clinical experience.

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