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Cancer research

Arrest defective 1 autoacetylation is a critical step in its ability to stimulate cancer cell proliferation.


PMID 20501853

Abstract

The N-acetyltransferase arrest defective 1 (ARD1) is an important regulator of cell growth and differentiation that has emerged recently as a critical molecule in cancer progression. However, the regulation of the enzymatic and biological activities of human ARD1 (hARD1) in cancer is presently poorly understood. Here, we report that hARD1 undergoes autoacetylation and that this modification is essential for its functional activation. Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and site-directed mutational analyses, we identified K136 residue as an autoacetylation target site. K136R mutation abolished the ability of hARD1 to promote cancer cell growth in vitro and tumor xenograft growth in vivo. Mechanistic investigations revealed that hARD1 autoacetylation stimulated cyclin D1 expression through activation of the transcription factors beta-catenin and activator protein-1. Our results show that hARD1 autoacetylation is critical for its activation and its ability to stimulate cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis.

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