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Dental materials : official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials

Development of an antimicrobial resin--a pilot study.


PMID 21112619

Abstract

To demonstrate that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) could be synthesized in situ in acrylic dental resins. Light-cure (LC; bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate, tetraethyleneglycol dimethacrylate, bisphenol A ethoxylate dimethacrylate blend) and chemical-cure systems (CC; orthodontic denture resin) were used to synthesize AgNPs using different concentrations of Ag benzoate (AgBz). Rockwell hardness for LC resins showed that resins could be cured with up to 0.15% AgBz, while the hardness of CC resins were unaffected in the concentrations tested. UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of AgNPs in both LC and CC resins. Generally, CC resins had better distribution of and much smaller AgNPs as compared to LC resins overall. In some samples, especially in LC resins, nanoclusters were visible. An in vitro release study over four-weeks showed that CC resins released the most Ag(+) ions, with release detected in all samples. However, LC resins only released Ag(+) ions when AgBz concentration was greater than 0.1% (w/w). AgNP-loaded CC resins made with 0.2 and 0.5% (w/w) AgBz were tested for antibacterial activity in vitro against Streptococcus mutans, and results showed 52.4% and a 97.5% bacterial inhibition, respectively. Further work is now warranted to test mechanical properties and to optimize the initiator system to produce commercially useful dental and medical resins. Success in this work could lead to a series of antimicrobial medical and dental biomaterials that can prevent secondary caries and infection of implants.