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Internal medicine (Tokyo, Japan)

Excess copper chelating therapy for Wilson disease induces anemia and liver dysfunction.


PMID 21757830

Abstract

A 37-year-old man was diagnosed with Wilson disease at the age of 14. His first manifestations were neurological. He was treated with trientine for more than 10 years and suffered from anemia and liver dysfunction. Wilson disease is a genetic disorder characterized by accumulation of copper in the body. Excess copper is toxic, but copper is an essential trace element. Copper-binding ceruloplasmin is important for iron metabolism. Excess copper chelating treatment-induced anemia and iron deposition in the liver was suspected. Proper monitoring of copper status is important for the management of Wilson disease.

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