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American journal of physiology. Lung cellular and molecular physiology

Coenzyme Q(1) as a probe for mitochondrial complex I activity in the intact perfused hyperoxia-exposed wild-type and Nqo1-null mouse lung.


PMID 22268123

Abstract

Previous studies showed that coenzyme Q(1) (CoQ(1)) reduction on passage through the rat pulmonary circulation was catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and mitochondrial complex I, but that NQO1 genotype was not a factor in CoQ(1) reduction on passage through the mouse lung. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the complex I contribution to CoQ(1) reduction in the isolated perfused wild-type (NQO1(+/+)) and Nqo1-null (NQO1(-)/(-)) mouse lung. CoQ(1) reduction was measured as the steady-state pulmonary venous CoQ(1) hydroquinone (CoQ(1)H(2)) efflux rate during infusion of CoQ(1) into the pulmonary arterial inflow. CoQ(1)H(2) efflux rates during infusion of 50 μM CoQ(1) were not significantly different for NQO1(+/+) and NQO1(-/-) lungs (0.80 ± 0.03 and 0.68 ± 0.07 μmol·min(-1)·g lung dry wt(-1), respectively, P > 0.05). The mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone depressed CoQ(1)H(2) efflux rates for both genotypes (0.19 ± 0.08 and 0.08 ± 0.04 μmol·min(-1)·g lung dry wt(-1) for NQO1(+/+) and NQO1(-/-), respectively, P < 0.05). Exposure of mice to 100% O(2) for 48 h also depressed CoQ(1)H(2) efflux rates in NQO1(+/+) and NQO1(-/-) lungs (0.43 ± 0.03 and 0.11 ± 0.04 μmol·min(-1)·g lung dry wt(-1), respectively, P < 0.05 by ANOVA). The impact of rotenone or hyperoxia on CoQ(1) redox metabolism could not be attributed to effects on lung wet-to-dry weight ratios, perfusion pressures, perfused surface areas, or total venous effluent CoQ(1) recoveries, the latter measured by spectrophotometry or mass spectrometry. Complex I activity in mitochondria-enriched lung fractions was depressed in hyperoxia-exposed lungs for both genotypes. This study provides new evidence for the potential utility of CoQ(1) as a nondestructive indicator of the impact of pharmacological or pathological exposures on complex I activity in the intact perfused mouse lung.