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Theriogenology

Characterization of proacrosin/acrosin system after liquid storage and cryopreservation of turkey semen (Meleagris gallopavo).


PMID 22704390

Abstract

This study was designed to identify the effect of liquid storage at 4 °C for 48 h and cryopreservation on the proacrosin/acrosin system of turkey spermatozoa. Anti-acrosin I antibodies were produced and used to demonstrate Western blot analysis profile of the proacrosin/acrosin system of sperm and seminal plasma and possible changes in the proacrosin/acrosin system of turkey sperm stored for 2.5, 24, and 48 h or cryopreserved. At the same time acrosin-like activity was examined by the measurement of amidase activity of sperm extracts, sperm suspension, and seminal plasma of turkey semen. A computer-assisted sperm analysis system was used to monitor the sperm motility characteristics of turkey sperm stored for 48 h or cryopreserved. Different profiles of the sperm proacrosin/acrosin system were observed regarding the presence or absence of inhibitors (p-nitrophenyl-p'-guanidine benzoate [NPGB] and Kazal family inhibitor) during the extraction process. When NPGB was present three main bands were observed with the molecular weight ranging from 66 to 35 kDa. Bands corresponding to acrosin I and II were not observed. In sperm extract without NPGB, three or four bands were observed with the molecular weight ranging from 41 to 30 kDa. The bands corresponding to acrosin I and II were observed. During liquid storage a decrease in sperm motility and an increase in sperm-extracted amidase activity were observed. After 24 and 48 h of storage, extracted amidase activity was higher than at 2.5 h by 24% and 31%, respectively. However, no changes in the Western blot analysis profiles of sperm extract and seminal plasma were visible during liquid storage. After cryopreservation a decrease in sperm motility and all sperm motility parameters were observed. In contrast to liquid storage, cryopreservation did not increase extracted amidase activity. However, changes in Western blot analysis profiles were visible in sperm extract and seminal plasma after cryopreservation. After freezing-thawing, additional bands appeared in sperm extract and seminal plasma. These bands were of different molecular weight regarding the presence or absence of NPGB. These data suggest that the mechanism of damage to the proacrosin/acrosin system is different for liquid storage and cryopreservation. Liquid storage seems to increase in the susceptibility of the proacrosin/acrosin system to be activated during extraction. Kazal inhibitors of turkey seminal plasma are involved in the control of proacrosin activation. The disturbances of the proacrosin/acrosin system of turkey spermatozoa can be related to a disturbance in the induction of the acrosome reaction. Our results may be important for a better understanding of the proacrosin/acrosin system of turkey spermatozoa and disturbance to this system during liquid storage and cryopreservation.