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Journal of medicinal food

Artichoke induces genetic toxicity and decreases ethyl methanesulfonate-related DNA damage in Chinese hamster ovary cells.


PMID 22892059

Abstract

Cynara scolymus L. (Asteraceae), popularly known as artichoke, has been widely used in herbal medicine for the treatment of hepatic diseases. The genotoxicity of C. scolymus L. leaf extract (LE) and the ability to modulate the genetic toxicity of the alkylating agent ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) were assessed using the comet assay on Chinese hamster ovary cells. Genotoxicity was evaluated after 1- and 24-h treatments using four different LE concentrations: 0.62, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/mL. Antigenotoxicity was assessed for pretreatment, simultaneous treatment, and post-treatment. All doses used led to a significant increase in the frequency of DNA damage, after exposure for 1 and 24 h. In the antigenotoxicity experiments, LE reduced the frequency of DNA damage induced by EMS in the simultaneous treatment only. However, the lowest dose was more protective than higher concentrations. Flavonoids and phenolic compounds are, probably, the C. scolymus constituents responsible for its genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects.

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72945
Ethyl methanesulfonate, certified reference material, TraceCERT®
C3H8O3S