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Pediatrics

US prevalence and trends in tobacco smoke exposure among children and adolescents with asthma.


PMID 23400612

Abstract

To examine exposure to tobacco smoke products (TSPs), environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), and in-home smoke among youth with asthma in the United States. Nationally representative, cross-sectional data from 2250 youth aged 4 to 19 years with current asthma in the 1988-1994, 1999-2004, and 2005-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were analyzed. Outcomes were use of TSPs (serum cotinine level >10 ng/mL or self-reported recent use of cigarettes, cigars, or pipes) and, among non-TSP users, ETS exposure (serum cotinine ≥0.05 ng/mL) and in-home smoke exposure (reported). Multiple logistic regression analyses assessed the associations between the outcomes and age, gender, race/ethnicity, and family income. Among adolescents (aged 12-19 years) with asthma in 2005-2010, 17.3% reported TSP use. Among youth (aged 4-19 years) with asthma who did not use TSPs, 53.2% were exposed to ETS and 17.6% had in-home smoke exposure. Among low-income youth, 70.1% and 28.1% had exposure to ETS and in-home smoke, respectively. After controlling for sociodemographic factors, higher prevalence of exposure to ETS and in-home smoke persisted among low-income youth. Between 1988-1994 and 2005-2010, there was a decline in ETS and in-home smoke exposure (both P < .001). ETS exposure among youth with asthma declined between 1988-1994 and 2005-2010, but a majority remained exposed in 2005-2010, with higher exposure among low-income youth. More than 1 in 6 youth with asthma in 2005-2010 were exposed to in-home smoke and a similar portion of adolescents used TSPs.