EMAIL THIS PAGE TO A FRIEND

International journal of cancer

Calorie intake, olive oil consumption and mammographic density among Spanish women.


PMID 24254818

Abstract

High mammographic density (MD) is one of the main risk factors for development of breast cancer. To date, however, relatively few studies have evaluated the association between MD and diet. In this cross-sectional study, we assessed the association between MD (measured using Boyd's semiquantitative scale with five categories: <10%, 10-25%, 25-50%, 50-75% and >75%) and diet (measured using a food frequency questionnaire validated in a Spanish population) among 3,548 peri- and postmenopausal women drawn from seven breast cancer screening programs in Spain. Multivariate ordinal logistic regression models, adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI), energy intake and protein consumption as well as other confounders, showed an association between greater calorie intake and greater MD [odds ratio (OR) = 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.38, for every increase of 500 cal/day], yet high consumption of olive oil was nevertheless found to reduce the prevalence of high MD (OR = 0.86;95% CI = 0.76-0.96, for every increase of 22 g/day in olive oil consumption); and, while greater intake of whole milk was likewise associated with higher MD (OR = 1.10; 95%CI 1.00-1.20, for every increase of 200 g/day), higher consumption of protein (OR = 0.89; 95% CI 0.80-1.00, for every increase of 30 g/day) and white meat (p for trend 0.041) was found to be inversely associated with MD. Our study, the largest to date to assess the association between diet and MD, suggests that MD is associated with modifiable dietary factors, such as calorie intake and olive oil consumption. These foods could thus modulate the prevalence of high MD, and important risk marker for breast cancer.