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Biochemistry

Human class I alcohol dehydrogenases catalyze the interconversion of alcohols and aldehydes in the metabolism of dopamine.


PMID 2432930

Abstract

The class I human liver alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs) catalyze the interconversion of the intermediary alcohols and aldehydes of dopamine metabolism in vitro, whereas those of the class II and class III do not. The individual, homogeneous class I isozymes oxidize (3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethanol and (4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)ethanol (HMPE) and ethanol with kcat/Km values in the range from 16 to 240 mM-1 min-1 and from 16 to 66 mM-1 min-1, respectively. They reduce the corresponding dopamine aldehydes (3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)acetaldehyde and (4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)acetaldehyde (HMPAL) with kcat/Km values varying from 7800 to 190,000 mM-1 min-1, considerably more efficient than the reduction of acetaldehyde with kcat/Km values from 780 to 4900 mM-1 min-1. For beta 1 gamma 2 ADH, ethanol competes with HMPE oxidation with a Ki of 23 microM. In addition, 1,10-phenanthroline inhibits HMPE oxidation and HMPAL reduction with Ki values of 20 microM and 12 microM, respectively, both quite similar to that for ethanol, Ki = 22 microM. Thus, both ethanol/acetaldehyde and the dopamine intermediates compete for the same site of ADH, a basis for the ethanol-induced in vivo alterations of dopamine metabolism.

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