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American heart journal

In-hospital switching of oral P2Y12 inhibitor treatment in patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: prevalence, predictors and short-term outcome.


PMID 24332144

Abstract

P2Y12 inhibitor switching has appeared in clinical practice as a consequence of prasugrel and ticagrelor availability, apart from clopidogrel, for use in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In the context of the GReek AntiPlatelet REgistry (GRAPE) we assessed the prevalence, predictive factors and short-term outcome of in-hospital P2Y12 inhibitor switching in 1794 ACS patients undergoing PCI. Switching occurred in 636 (35.5%) patients of which in the form of clopidogrel to a novel agent, novel agent to clopidogrel and between prasugrel and ticagrelor in 574 (90.4%), 34 (5.3%) and 27 (4.3%) patients, respectively. Presentation to non PCI-capable hospital, bivalirudin use, age ≥75 years (inverse predictor), and regional trends emerged as predictive factors of switching to a novel agent. At combined in-hospital and one-month follow-up, propensity matched pairs analysis showed no differences in major adverse cardiovascular (MACE) or bleeding events between switching from clopidogrel to a novel agent vs novel agent constant administration. More Bleeding Academic Research Consortium type 1, type 2 and any type events and fewer MACE were seen when switching from clopidogrel to a novel agent vs only clopidogrel administration (23.7%, 3.8%, 30.6%, 1.2% vs 8.9%, 1.2%, 12.0%, 3.8% with P < .001, P = .03, P < .001 and P = .03 respectively). In a real-life experience with contemporary antiplatelet treatment in ACS patients undergoing PCI, in-hospital switching represents common clinical practice. Clinical factors and regional practice differences seem to affect this strategy's choice, while switching to a novel agent may be associated with higher risk of bleeding.