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PloS one

Soluble CD93 levels in patients with acute myocardial infarction and its implication on clinical outcome.


PMID 24801400

Abstract

Inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of acute myocardial infarction (MI). However, it is unclear whether marker of immune activation will provide prognostic information in these patients. We hypothesized that circulating levels of soluble CD93 (sCD93), a soluble form of transmembrane glycoprotein CD93, is increased in acute MI patients and its level would be associated with clinical outcomes in patients with acute MI. We measured circulating levels of sCD93 in 120 patients with acute MI (63±13 yrs, M∶F = 85∶35) and in 120 age, sex-matched control subjects. In patients with acute MI, clinical characteristics, echocardiographic and laboratory findings were assessed at the time of initial enrollment. The primary outcome was defined as all-cause and cardiovascular death. Circulating sCD93 levels were significantly higher in patients with acute MI than in control subjects (552.1±293.7 vs. 429.8±114.2 ng/mL, p<0.0001). Upon in vitro inflammatory stimulation, increased CD93 shedding was demonstrated in acute MI patients but not in control subjects. During follow up period (median 208 days, 3-1058 days), the primary outcome occurred in 18 (15%) patients (9 cardiovascular deaths). Circulating levels of sCD93 were associated with all cause (p<0.0001) and cardiovascular (p<0.0001) mortality in patients with acute MI. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that initial sCD93 level was found to be an independent predictor of all cause (p = 0.002) and cardiovascular mortality (p = 0.033) when controlled for age and left ventricular ejection fraction. Circulating levels of sCD93 are elevated in patients with acute MI and their levels were associated with adverse clinical outcomes.