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Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research

Aberrant methylation of PCDH10 predicts worse biochemical recurrence-free survival in patients with prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy.


PMID 25086586

Abstract

Prostate cancer is a common malignancy in men, and inevitably some patients experience biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. To date, there are no reliable predictors for prostate cancer recurrence, and novel predictors are urgently needed. PCDH10 (protocadherin-10) is a novel tumor suppressor gene, which is down-regulated by promoter methylation in prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using PCDH10 methylation to predict the biochemical recurrence (BCR) of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy. Fresh tissue samples were obtained from 151 patients with primary prostate cancer, and from 34 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) as control. The methylation status of PCDH10 in prostate cancer tissues and controls were examined using methylation-specific PCR (MSP), and then associated with clinicopathological features and BCR-free survival of patients with prostate cancer. We found that PCDH10 methylation was detected in 79 (52.3%) patients with prostate cancer, but no methylation was found in controls (P<0.0001). Moreover, PCDH10 methylation was significantly associated with higher preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (P <0.0001), higher Gleason Score (P<0.0001), advanced clinical stage (P=0.0002), lymph node metastasis (P=0.0389), angiolymphatic invasion (P=0.0303), and biochemical recurrence (P=0.0068). Moreover, PCDH10 methylation was associated with poor BCR-free survival (P<0.0001), and may be used as an independent predictor of BCR-free survival (P=0.0046). Our results indicate that PCDH10 methylation in prostate cancer tissue is an independent prognostic biomarker of worse BCR-free survival of patients with prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy.