EMAIL THIS PAGE TO A FRIEND

The American journal of cardiology

Prognostic value of early acute kidney injury after primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.


PMID 25159240

Abstract

The pattern and prognostic impact of "early" acute kidney injury (AKI) after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction have not been well established. From November 2005 to November 2011, 971 post-myocardial infarction patients who underwent primary PCI were analyzed. Early AKI was defined using absolute change in serum creatinine (SCr; SCr <24 hours after primary PCI minus admission SCr) as follows: no early AKI (SCr change <0.3 mg/dl), mild early AKI (SCr change 0.3 to <0.5 mg/dl), moderate early AKI (SCr change 0.5 to <1.0 mg/dl), and severe early AKI (SCr change ≥1.0 mg/dl). One-year major adverse cardiac events were defined as death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and revascularizations. Overall, 9.6% had early AKI, including 5.7% with mild, 2.5% with moderate, and 1.4% with severe early AKI. Diabetes mellitus (odds ratio 1.84, p = 0.042), the left ventricular ejection fraction (odds ratio 0.97, p = 0.042), and hemoglobin levels (odds ratio 0.84, p = 0.039) were independently associated with early AKI. Early AKI (adjusted hazard ratio 2.80, p = 0.005) was an independent predictor of 1-year major adverse cardiac events. The adjusted hazard ratios of 1-year major adverse cardiac events from the lowest (reference) to the highest quartile of early AKI were as follows: 1, 2.87 (p = 0.012), 3.22 (p = 0.021), and 5.83 (p = 0.004), respectively. In conclusion, early dynamic change in renal function after primary PCI can sensitively predict worse outcomes.