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Cell biochemistry and biophysics

Disruption of circulating CD4+ T-lymphocyte subpopulations in psoriasis patients is ameliorated by narrow-band UVB therapy.


PMID 25269772

Abstract

Narrow-band UVB (NB-UVB) therapy is widely used in the treatment of psoriasis; however, its precise mechanism is still unclear. To investigate the circulating CD4(+) T-lymphocyte subpopulations in psoriasis patients before and after NB-UVB, thus providing new insights into the mechanism of NB-UVB in the treatment of psoriasis. We performed NB-UVB treatments for psoriasis patients (n = 30) and used flow cytometry, real-time PCR, and ELISA for the detection of circulating CD4(+) T-lymphocyte subpopulations. The results were compared with healthy controls (n = 20) as well. We found increased circulating T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cell levels as well as decreased circulating regulatory T cells (Treg) levels compared to healthy controls. Additionally, there was a positive correlation between the percentage of circulating Th17 cells and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score. Furthermore, the percentage of circulating Th17 cells was negatively correlated with the Treg cells which led to an imbalance of Th17/Treg. NB-UVB therapy significantly reduced circulating Th1and Th17 cell levels while increasing Treg cell levels. These findings indicate that the overexpression of Th1 and Th17 cells together with the imbalance of Th17/Treg cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. The mechanism of NB-UVB in the treatment of psoriasis may be through the inhibition of Th1 and Th17 cell immune response as well as the promotion of Treg cell immune response, thus ameliorating the disorder of circulating CD4(+) T-lymphocyte subsets.