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Digestive diseases and sciences

Bacterial translocation and endotoxemia after pringle maneuver in cirrhotic rats.


PMID 25287003

Abstract

Pringle maneuver (Pm) is advocated for the reduction of blood loss during liver surgery, while postoperative infections continue to be a frequent complication after hepatic resection and liver transplantation. To investigate the effect of the Pringle maneuver on systemic bacterial translocation and endotoxemia in cirrhotic rats and cirrhotic rats with selective intestinal decontamination. A total of 100 male Sprague-Dawley cirrhotic rats were randomly divided into five equal groups: sham operation, Pm of 10 min, Pm of 20 min, Pm of 30 min, and pretreatment. Tissue samples from mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, lungs, portal, and vena cava vein blood were obtained for culture after 30 min and 24 h of the operation. Endotoxin levels were measured in portal vein and vena cava blood. Portal vein and vena cava blood endotoxin concentrations increased significantly after 30 min, especially 24 h of operation in the Pm of 20 min and Pm of 30 min groups. A significant increase in contaminated mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, portal, and vena cava blood was noted 24 h later. The incidence of gut bacterial translocation increased with the duration extension of Pm. Escherichia coli was the most common bacteria isolated from the tissues. There was a significant decrease of portal vein and vena cava blood endotoxin concentrations and the incidence of bacterial translocation by selective intestinal decontamination. There is endotoxemia immediately after Pringle maneuver and gut bacteria translocation 24 h later. The incidence of gut bacterial translocation increases with the duration extension of Pm. Selective intestinal decontamination can decrease bacteria translocation and endotoxemia.