EMAIL THIS PAGE TO A FRIEND

The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism

Dietary protein intake affects amino acid and acylcarnitine metabolism in infants aged 6 months.


PMID 25368978

Abstract

The protective effect of breast-feeding against later obesity may be explained by the lower protein content compared with formula milk. However, the metabolic mechanisms remain unknown. We studied the metabolic response to a higher or lower protein supply in infancy. The Childhood Obesity Project study is a double-blind, randomized, multicenter intervention trial. Infants were randomized to receive a higher (HP) or lower protein (LP) content infant formula or were breast-fed. Plasma samples of 691 infants who received formula milk with different protein content (HP, 2.05 g per 100 mL; LP, 1.25 g per 100 mL) or were breast-fed were collected. Changes in plasma amino acid and acylcarnitine concentrations of 6-month-old infants according to different dietary protein supply were determined by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Twenty-nine metabolites differed significantly between the formula groups. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) were the most discriminant metabolites. Their degradation products, the short-chain acylcarnitines C3, C4, and C5, were also significantly elevated in the HP group. A breakpoint analysis confirmed that with increasing BCAAs, the ratio between acylcarnitines and BCAAs decreases. Long-chain acylcarnitines were decreased in HP infants. BCAAs seem to play a pivotal role in the effect of a high-protein diet on β-oxidation and fat storage. We provide new evidence for a possible saturation of the BCAA degradation pathway that may represent the mechanism by which high-protein intake affects the metabolic regulation. Moreover, it appears to inhibit the initial step of the β-oxidation, thus leading to high early weight gain and body fat deposition.

Related Materials

Product #

Image

Description

Molecular Formula

Add to Cart

A1270000
Arginine, European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
C6H14N4O2
A1330000
Aspartic acid, European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
C4H7NO4
A9006
DL-Aspartic acid, ≥99% (TLC)
C4H7NO4
147966
DL-Phenylalanine, ReagentPlus®, 99%
C9H11NO2
W372609
DL-Phenylalanine, 99%, FCC
C9H11NO2
78040
DL-Phenylalanine, puriss., ≥99.0% (NT)
C9H11NO2
94640
DL-Valine, ReagentPlus®, ≥99.0% (NT)
C5H11NO2
W344400
DL-Valine, ≥97%
C5H11NO2
G0355000
Glutamic acid, European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
C5H9NO4
H0750000
Histidine, European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
C6H9N3O2
I0460000
Isoleucine, European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
C6H13NO2
I2752
L-Isoleucine, reagent grade, ≥98% (HPLC)
C6H13NO2
I7403
L-Isoleucine, from non-animal source, meets EP, JP, USP testing specifications, suitable for cell culture, 98.5-101.0%
C6H13NO2
PHR1099
L-Isoleucine, Pharmaceutical Secondary Standard; Certified Reference Material
C6H13NO2
W527602
L-Isoleucine, 99%, FCC, FG
C6H13NO2
I5281
L-Isoleucine, PharmaGrade, Ajinomoto, EP, JP, USP, Manufactured under appropriate GMP controls for pharma or biopharmaceutical production, suitable for cell culture
C6H13NO2
58879
L-Isoleucine, BioUltra, ≥99.5% (NT)
C6H13NO2
56241
L-Isoleucine, certified reference material, TraceCERT®
C6H13NO2
PHR1242
L-Threonine, Pharmaceutical Secondary Standard; Certified Reference Material
C4H9NO3
61506
L-Threonine, certified reference material, TraceCERT®
C4H9NO3
T1340000
L-Threonine, European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
C4H9NO3
P1150000
Phenylalanine, European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
C9H11NO2
V0030000
Valine, European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
C5H11NO2