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Investigative ophthalmology & visual science

Cyclocoagulation of the ciliary bodies by high-intensity focused ultrasound: a 12-month multicenter study.


PMID 25604688

Abstract

To evaluate the safety and efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) cyclocoagulation in reducing intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with refractory glaucoma by using a novel miniaturized delivery device (EyeOP1). We conducted a 12-month open-label multicenter prospective study (EyeMUST1 Study). Patients with primary (primary open-angle glaucoma [POAG]) or secondary refractory glaucoma were treated in two groups depending on the duration of each ultrasound shot (group 1: 4 seconds; group 2: 6 seconds). The primary efficacy outcome was based on IOP reduction at 6 and 12 months. Fifty-two patients were enrolled: 36 (69%) had POAG and 16 (31%) had secondary glaucoma. Group 1 (n = 24) and group 2 (n = 28) had similar demographics and baseline characteristics. In group 1, IOP was reduced from a mean preoperative value of 29.7 ± 7.7 mm Hg (n = 3.5 glaucoma medications) to a mean postoperative value of 21.3 ± 6.7 mm Hg (n = 3.5 glaucoma medications) and 20.1 ± 6.7 mm Hg (n = 3.2 glaucoma medications) at 6 and 12 months, respectively. In group 2, IOP was reduced from a mean preoperative value of 29.0 ± 7.4 mm Hg (n = 3.3 glaucoma medications) to a mean postoperative value of 20.2 ± 7.4 mm Hg (n = 3.4 glaucoma medications) and 18.5 ± 6.6 mm Hg (n = 3.5 glaucoma medications) at 6 and 12 months, respectively. At 12 months, the IOP reduction was sustained in both groups (32% IOP reduction in group 1 and 36% IOP reduction in group 2). The overall tolerance of the technique was good, with no serious adverse events. The new miniaturized HIFU EyeOP1 delivery device seems to be effective in decreasing IOP in patients with refractory glaucoma. The technology offers a good safety profile. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01338467.).