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Chemosphere

Oxidative stress in bacteria (Pseudomonas putida) exposed to nanostructures of silicon carbide.


PMID 25965002

Abstract

Silicon carbide (SiC) nanostructures produced by combustion synthesis can cause oxidative stress in the bacterium Pseudomonas putida. The results of this study showed that SiC nanostructures damaged the cell membrane, which can lead to oxidative stress in living cells and to the loss of cell viability. As a reference, micrometric SiC was also used, which did not exhibit toxicity toward cells. Oxidative stress was studied by analyzing the activity of peroxidases, and the expression of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (zwf1) using real-time PCR and northern blot techniques. Damage to nucleic acid was studied by isolating and hydrolyzing plasmids with the formamidopyrimidine [fapy]-DNA glycosylase (also known as 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase) (Fpg), which is able to detect damaged DNA. The level of viable microbial cells was investigated by propidium iodide and acridine orange staining.