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Tissue engineering. Part A

High-Throughput Screening of Surface Marker Expression on Undifferentiated and Differentiated Human Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells.


PMID 26020286

Abstract

Adipose tissue contains an abundant source of multipotent mesenchymal cells termed "adipose-derived stromal cells" (ASCs) that hold potential for regenerative medicine. However, the heterogeneity inherent to ASCs harvested using standard methodologies remains largely undefined, particularly in regards to differences across donors. Identifying the subpopulations of ASCs predisposed toward differentiation along distinct lineages holds value for improving graft survival, predictability, and efficiency. Human ASCs (hASCs) from three different donors were independently isolated by density-based centrifugation from adipose tissue and maintained in culture or differentiated along either adipogenic or osteogenic lineages using differentiation media. Undifferentiated and differentiated hASCs were then analyzed for the presence of 242 human surface markers by flow cytometry analysis. By comprehensively characterizing the surface marker profile of undifferentiated hASCs using flow cytometry, we gained novel insights into the heterogeneity underlying protein expression on the surface of cultured undifferentiated hASCs across different donors. Comparison of the surface marker profile of undifferentiated hASCs with hASCs that have undergone osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation allowed for the identification of surface markers that were upregulated and downregulated by osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation. Osteogenic differentiation induced upregulation of CD164 and downregulation of CD49a, CD49b, CD49c, CD49d, CD55, CD58, CD105, and CD166 while adipogenic differentiation induced upregulation of CD36, CD40, CD146, CD164, and CD271 and downregulation of CD49b, CD49c, CD49d, CD71, CD105, and CD166. These results lend support to the notion that hASCs isolated using standard methodologies represent a heterogeneous population and serve as a foundation for future studies seeking to maximize their regenerative potential through fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based selection before therapy.