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Journal of clinical lipidology

Adolescent and adult African Americans have similar metabolic dyslipidemia.


PMID 26073396

Abstract

African Americans (AAs) have lower triglyceride (TG) and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) than other ethnic groups; yet, they also have higher risk for developing diabetes mellitus despite the strong relationship of dyslipidemia with insulin resistance. No studies directly compare adolescents and adults with regard to relationships among dyslipidemia, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and insulin resistance. Here, we compare AA adolescents to adults with regard to the relationships of adiposity-related lipid risk markers (TG-to-HDL ratio and non-HDL-C) with body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA), and hs-CRP. Two cohorts of healthy AA were recruited from the same urban community. Participants in each cohort were stratified by TG-to-HDL ratio (based on adult tertiles) and non-HDL-C levels. BMI, WC, HOMA, and hs-CRP were compared in adolescents and adults in the low-, middle-, and high-lipid strata. Prevalence of TG-to-HDL ratio greater than 2.028 (high group) was 16% (44 of 283) in adolescents and 33% (161 of 484) in adults; prevalence of non-HDL-C above 145 and 160, respectively, was 8% (22 of 283) in adolescents and 12% (60 of 484) in adults. Values of hs-CRP were lower, and HOMA values were higher in adolescents (both Pxa0