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International journal of molecular medicine

Resveratrol prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in H9c2 cells through the inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the activation of the Sirt1 pathway.


PMID 26202177

Abstract

Treatment with doxorubicin (DOX) is one of the major causes of chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity and is therefore, the principal limiting factor in the effectiveness of chemotherapy for cancer patients. DOX‑induced heart failure is thought to result from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Resveratrol (RV), a polyphenol antioxidant found in red wine, has been shown to play a cardioprotective role. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of RV on DOX‑induced cardiotoxicity in H9c2 cells. We hypothesized that RV would protect H9c2 cells against DOX‑induced ER stress and subsequent cell death through the activation of the Sirt1 pathway. Our results demonstrated that the decrease observed in the viability of the H9c2 cells following exposure to DOX was accompanied by a significant increase in the expression of the ER stress‑related proteins, glucose‑regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). However, we found that RV downregulated the expression of ER stress marker protein in the presence of DOX and restored the viability of the H9c2 cells. Exposure to RV or DOX alone only slightly increased the protein expression of Sirt1, whereas a significant increase in Sirt1 protein levels was observed in the cells treated with both RV and DOX. The Sirt1 inhibitor, nicotinamide (NIC), partially neutralized the effects of RV on the expression of Sirt1 in the DOX‑treated cells and completely abolished the effects of RV on the expression of GRP78 and CHOP. The findings of our study suggest that RV protects H9c2 cells against DOX‑induced ER stress through ER stabilization, and more specifically through the activation of the Sirt1 pathway, thereby leading to cardiac cell survival.