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Chinese medical journal

Prophylactic Antitumor Effect of Mixed Heat Shock Proteins/Peptides in Mouse Sarcoma.


PMID 26265619

Abstract

To develop a vaccine-based immunotherapy for sarcoma, we evaluated a mixture of heat shock proteins (mHSPs) as a vaccine for sarcoma treatment in a mouse model. Heat shock protein/peptides (HSP/Ps) are autoimmune factors that can induce both adaptive and innate immune responses; HSP/Ps isolated from tumors can induce antitumor immune activity when used as vaccines. In this study, we evaluated the effects of mHSP/Ps on prophylactic antitumor immunity. We extracted mHSP/Ps, including HSP60, HSP70, GP96, and HSP110, from the mouse sarcoma cell lines S180 and MCA207 using chromatography. The immunity induced by mHSP/Ps was assessed using flow cytometry, ELISPOT, lactate dehydrogenase release, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Of S180 sarcoma-bearing mice immunized with mHSP/Ps isolated from S180 cells, 41.2% showed tumor regression and long-term survival, with a tumor growth inhibition rate of 82.3% at 30 days. Of MCA207 sarcoma-bearing mice immunized with mHSP/Ps isolated from MCA207 cells, 50% showed tumor regression and long-term survival with a tumor growth inhibition rate of 79.3%. All control mice died within 40 days. The proportions of natural killer cells, CD8+, and interferon-γ-secreting cells and tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity were increased in the immunized group. Vaccination with a polyvalent mHSP/P cancer vaccine can induce an immunological response and a marked antitumor response to autologous tumors. This mHSP/P vaccine exerted greater antitumor effects than did HSP70, HSP60, or tumor lysates alone.